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Pest Control

Bagworms

Bagworms are most common on evergreen trees and shrubs. Juniper,
arborvitae, cedar, and spruce may be killed if completely defoliated. Less severe attacks can slow growth. Evergreen windbreaks and low growing foundation plantings around houses need to be checked carefully starting in late May.

Although bagworms prefer evergreens, they can feed on nearly every kind of tree, shrub and perennial. Damage is usually not serious from attacks on deciduous plants since they grow new leaves. The growth of small or newly planted trees, however, could be slowed by leaf feeding.

In Kansas, the year’s new bagworms usually begin to leave the protection of their mother’s bag in late May. They immediately start feeding and spinning a silk “coat.” At this young age they are very small and easy to control. The first evidence of infestation is the presence of 1/4 inch bags. As larvae grow, leaf fragments are added to the bag, which may reach a length of 2 inches by the end of summer. Larvae feed until late August or early September. After that point, spraying is not effective.

The adult female moth is wingless and never leaves the bag. Adult males are small, clear-winged moths that look like a wasp. Males emerge in September and mate with females through the bag entrance. Bagworms overwinter in the egg stage inside female bags fastened to twigs. During this period (September to May) they are protected from any control except hand picking. You may destroy bags by crushing or immersing in soapy water. If bags containing larvae are discarded on the ground, the larvae may return to the host plants.

For the most effective control and prevention of damage, spray with ferti•lome Borer, Bagworm, Tent Caterpillar & Leafminer Spray every 7 to 10 days into July to make sure you get all the worms as they hatch. They are easier to control while small.
 

Grub Control

   

Every year we battle the beast of the grub!Grub worms feast underground on the roots of your turf, in turn killing off sections, or patches, of your yard. The appearance of grub damage is patches of brown, or dead grass across your yard, and is similar to that of damage done by fungus, but the result is much worse. Even if you treated your lawn for grubworms in previous years, you'll want to be sure to do it annually. The best control for grubs is applying Hi-Yield Grub Free Zone II in late spring/early summer before your grass is stressed by heat. For a second application during the summer months apply Hi-Yield Kill-A-Grub, and this will kill grubs up to the second molt.